Does Morgoth have wings?

Flammifer

Well-Known Member
Well, I'm not sure that there is any evidence as to whether he does or not in history, but it could be that he does in the future?

The second prophecy of Mandos (deleted from 'The Silmarillion' by Christopher Tolkien, but to be found in 'The History of Middle-earth') says that at the End of Days, "When the world is old and the Powers grow weary, then Morgoth, seeing that the guard sleepeth, shall come back through the Door of Night out of the Timeless Void; and destroy the Sun and Moon. But Earendil shall descend upon him as a white and searing flame and drive him from the airs."

So, to destroy the Sun and Moon, and then be driven from the airs by Earendil, is Morgoth deploying wings to fly? Or is he flying via other means?

Morgoth, as a being of pure spirit, who can cloak himself in bodily form, can presumably shape his body to his desires. If he wants wings he should be able to have wings?

Does this imply that though we all know that the Balrog did not have wings, he could have had them had he wanted?
 

Odola

Well-Known Member
Well, I'm not sure that there is any evidence as to whether he does or not in history, but it could be that he does in the future?

The second prophecy of Mandos (deleted from 'The Silmarillion' by Christopher Tolkien, but to be found in 'The History of Middle-earth') says that at the End of Days, "When the world is old and the Powers grow weary, then Morgoth, seeing that the guard sleepeth, shall come back through the Door of Night out of the Timeless Void; and destroy the Sun and Moon. But Earendil shall descend upon him as a white and searing flame and drive him from the airs."

So, to destroy the Sun and Moon, and then be driven from the airs by Earendil, is Morgoth deploying wings to fly? Or is he flying via other means?

Morgoth, as a being of pure spirit, who can cloak himself in bodily form, can presumably shape his body to his desires. If he wants wings he should be able to have wings?

Does this imply that though we all know that the Balrog did not have wings, he could have had them had he wanted?
I do think so. But Balrog is a fire spirit and fire normally doesn't fly around so it just hasn't appeared to him.
 

Haerangil

Well-Known Member
The Balrog is not in spiritform, it is incarnate, embodied.So is Morgpth who is sort of imprisoned in the mutilated body he made for himself.Also Morgoth has lost his ability to take fair form... i guess it does not mean he has totally lost his ability to shift shape.Even the balrog does shapeshift during his fight wirh Gandalf if i recall correctly...

But still that quote is interesting and puzzling.
 
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Anthony Lawther

Well-Known Member
Well, I'm not sure that there is any evidence as to whether he does or not in history, but it could be that he does in the future?

The second prophecy of Mandos (deleted from 'The Silmarillion' by Christopher Tolkien, but to be found in 'The History of Middle-earth') says that at the End of Days, "When the world is old and the Powers grow weary, then Morgoth, seeing that the guard sleepeth, shall come back through the Door of Night out of the Timeless Void; and destroy the Sun and Moon. But Earendil shall descend upon him as a white and searing flame and drive him from the airs."

So, to destroy the Sun and Moon, and then be driven from the airs by Earendil, is Morgoth deploying wings to fly? Or is he flying via other means?

Morgoth, as a being of pure spirit, who can cloak himself in bodily form, can presumably shape his body to his desires. If he wants wings he should be able to have wings?

Does this imply that though we all know that the Balrog did not have wings, he could have had them had he wanted?
Maybe Morgoth hangs onto the frame of the Door of Night and assails the Sun and Moon as they fly past. Then Eärendil flies down to knock loose his grip on the frame, causing him to plummet, Balrog like, to the ground.
 
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