On the Abilities of Elves

Ange1e4e5

Well-Known Member
So it’s been tossed around, the physical abilities of Elves and is a current topic in the Script for S4E9. We know that Elves are stronger and faster than Men, but how strong? How fast are their reflexes? Their speed? How far can they see to hit, ie can they accomplish an arrow shot at 400+ yards, meaning they have better muscle control? Do they have greater endurance and build up lactic acid slower (they still do have lactic acid buildup since Fingolfin tires and this is what allows Morgoth to get him down and squash him like a bug.)? And since Orcs are a ruined and terrible form of Elf, do they have similar abilities?
 
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amysrevenge

Well-Known Member
This is a thing that periodically creeps into the back of my mind, and is so hard to show or describe. We need the Elves to not just be regular dudes with pointy ears. The trouble is portraying their alien-ness, but also their familiarity as they aren't completely alien either. Their blood is filled with what we may call magic, is the only way I can describe it. You can study the physiology with your microscopes and your chemicals, but you won't be able to find it.

I don't have any practical solutions at this time, only worries. Haha I'm helpful.
 

Haakon

Administrator
Staff member
Ok so maybe we should try to define it...break it down... Agility, resilience, endurance, preceptual abilities, etc. What are the differences between Men and Elves? Ask ourselves questions like "How well would an elf do in the Olympics?" There's a risk it will be a bit boring, though...
 

Haakon

Administrator
Staff member
Ask ourselves questions like "How well would an elf do in the Olympics?"
I suggest , for example, that we could multiply the jumping capacity of Men with a factor of 1.5 to get the capacity of the Elves. The long jump world record among the Elves would then be 13,43 meters or just over 44 feet. The high jump world record would be about 12 feet.
We could say that the 100 metres record would be 1.5 times faster, 6.38 seconds.
The javelin world record would be 484 feet using the same factor.

We obviously cannot use the same factor for all abilities.

Another question is - are all of the elves that good? What does the average look like?
 

Ange1e4e5

Well-Known Member
I suggest , for example, that we could multiply the jumping capacity of Men with a factor of 1.5 to get the capacity of the Elves. The long jump world record among the Elves would then be 13,43 meters or just over 44 feet. The high jump world record would be about 12 feet.
We could say that the 100 metres record would be 1.5 times faster, 6.38 seconds.
The javelin world record would be 484 feet using the same factor.

We obviously cannot use the same factor for all abilities.

Another question is - are all of the elves that good? What does the average look like?
Perhaps the Sindar and Silvan are lower-level, merely at the peak of human ability and the Calaquendi are considerably stronger, faster reflexes, don't tire as easily?
 

MithLuin

Well-Known Member
Legolas is our primary example of a Sinda, and his First Age equivalent is Beleg. Except that Beleg should surpass Legolas.

Legolas' main endurance stats come from the Three Hunters incident, when they are tracking the orcs across Rohan.

Just to point out that 'really good for a human' doesn't quite cover it. Legolas consistently surpasses Aragorn in those scenes, and Aragorn is the one who is 'really good for a human '.
 

Ange1e4e5

Well-Known Member
Legolas is our primary example of a Sinda, and his First Age equivalent is Beleg. Except that Beleg should surpass Legolas.

Legolas' main endurance stats come from the Three Hunters incident, when they are tracking the orcs across Rohan.

Just to point out that 'really good for a human' doesn't quite cover it. Legolas consistently surpasses Aragorn in those scenes, and Aragorn is the one who is 'really good for a human '.
Are First Age Sinda stronger/more powerful than later Sinda like Legolas?
 

MithLuin

Well-Known Member
Yes, for the most part, though there are certainly 'below average' individuals in any group. Beleg is an elf of Cuivienen, so he should be more impressive than a Third Age Sinda (in general). Noldor born in Middle-earth (ie, Gil-galad) should be less impressive than Calaquendi born in Valinor who saw the light of the Trees with their own eyes.

In Tolkien's world, things fade and diminish over time. There's a bit of an anti-progress effect going on. It's similar to a medieval viewpoint looking back to "the glory that was Greece and the grandeur that was Rome."
 

Nicholas Palazzo

Well-Known Member
To be fair, even the Balrogs take somewhat of a beating when the Calaquendi first arrive, with the light of the Trees still bright in their eyes…
Careful with that kind of talk. The party line is that the balrogs are nigh indestructible and can stand alone amongst an army of the Noldor and suffer neither injury nor death.
 

Ange1e4e5

Well-Known Member
Careful with that kind of talk. The party line is that the balrogs are nigh indestructible and can stand alone amongst an army of the Noldor and suffer neither injury nor death.
I've been having trouble with this since it was decided that the Balrogs would be participating in the Dagor Aglareb; if they're nigh indestructible and can withstand alone amongst an army of the Noldor and suffer neither injury or death, how do they lose the battle?
 

Nicholas Palazzo

Well-Known Member
I've been having trouble with this since it was decided that the Balrogs would be participating in the Dagor Aglareb; if they're nigh indestructible and can withstand alone amongst an army of the Noldor and suffer neither injury or death, how do they lose the battle?
A question which shall be answered next week.
 
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