Influences on the horn call of Buckland?

SamOppedisano

New Member
This is completely irrelevant to everything that we are talking about in class at the moment, and I am not sure if someone else has mentioned this on here before, but here it is.

I am currently reading Macbeth for the first time, and upon reading Act 2 Scene 3, Macduff's exclamation following Duncan's death reminded me of the horn call of Buckland, "Awake! Fear! Fire! Foes! Awake!" The passage from Macbeth reads,
"Awake, awake! Ring the alarum-bell. Murder and treason! Banquo and Donalbain! Malcolm! awake! (line 848)" We know that Tolkien read Macbeth and was influenced by it, and I'm curious what everyone thinks.
 

Kate Neville

Active Member
An interesting parallel of phrase: certainly the Bucklanders had some experience of trees that seem to move! Perhaps Billy Boyd (a Scot) should have played Merry instead of Pippin.
 

Lincoln Alpern

Active Member
Interesting observation. I also read Macbeth for the first (and so far, only) time a couple years ago, and later noticed a similarity between the initial meeting of Macduff and Malcolm in the play with Strider's introduction to the Hobbits in Bree. Tolkien's Birnham wood and "none born of woman" inspirations are well known, but I think we can find more subtle connections - intentional or otherwise - if we look more closely.

... Coincidentally, as I type this I'm listening to the recording of Session 5.10 of the Silmarillion Film Project, and Corey just compared Morgoth's deterioration as a villain over the course of the Silmarillion to Macbeth's deterioration over the course of the play.
 

SamOppedisano

New Member
This is completely irrelevant to everything that we are talking about in class at the moment, and I am not sure if someone else has mentioned this on here before, but here it is.

I am currently reading Macbeth for the first time, and upon reading Act 2 Scene 3, Macduff's exclamation following Duncan's death reminded me of the horn call of Buckland, "Awake! Fear! Fire! Foes! Awake!" The passage from Macbeth reads,
"Awake, awake! Ring the alarum-bell. Murder and treason! Banquo and Donalbain! Malcolm! awake! (line 848)" We know that Tolkien read Macbeth and was influenced by it, and I'm curious what everyone thinks.
Also, Macbeth says “cracks of doom” in act 4 scene 1
 
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