The Fingering of the Horn

Corey pointed out that Boromir blows his horn when he is about to step out and put forth, when he is taking action toward or against something. Indeed, his desire to literally use the ring to take action against Sauron can be seen expressed when he fingers the horn - he is thinking about the potential of using the ring and therein blowing his horn into battle.

What I find MOST interesting though in Boromir's fidgeting with his horn is that it also seems to be an expression of his "putting forth," "taking action," and in a figurative way "setting out to do battle" against the Elvish counsels of hiding and destroying. It is almost as if his "fingering" of the horn is a subtle "blowing" of the horn, as he engages in debate (battle) against these ideas. I can almost see his fingering of the horn as a constant habit he employs whenever doing such battle, literal or figurative.
 

Flammifer

Well-Known Member
Gandalf is almost certain to win. Aragorn will be the last to lose all his money to Gandalf. Sam will surprise everyone by coming in third. Boromir or Pippin will be the first to go broke?

(Boromir's poker strategy and tactics are sound, but he will finger his horn every time he has a great hand, or is trying to bluff. Frodo is the first to pick up on this tell. Once Gandalf and Aragorn also recognize it, Boromir is doomed!)
 

Katriana

New Member
Can't imagine Pippin having a very good poker face though, even if he is probably clever enough to pick up on the others' tells.
 

Kate Neville

Active Member
Corey pointed out that Boromir blows his horn when he is about to step out and put forth, when he is taking action toward or against something. Indeed, his desire to literally use the ring to take action against Sauron can be seen expressed when he fingers the horn - he is thinking about the potential of using the ring and therein blowing his horn into battle.

What I find MOST interesting though in Boromir's fidgeting with his horn is that it also seems to be an expression of his "putting forth," "taking action," and in a figurative way "setting out to do battle" against the Elvish counsels of hiding and destroying. It is almost as if his "fingering" of the horn is a subtle "blowing" of the horn, as he engages in debate (battle) against these ideas. I can almost see his fingering of the horn as a constant habit he employs whenever doing such battle, literal or figurative.
It seems to me that the horn represents both Gondor and the Stewardship. It is, after all, an heirloom of his house, given to him by his father. Boromir's primary responsibility is the protection of Gondor and its people, and it may be that when he fingers the horn he is asking himself WWDD (what would Denethor do?). I haven't had time to look through the original drafts of the council in HoMe, so I don't know when the horn became so important to his character.
 

Rachel Port

Active Member
It seems to me that the horn represents both Gondor and the Stewardship. It is, after all, an heirloom of his house, given to him by his father. Boromir's primary responsibility is the protection of Gondor and its people,
Yes. The inheritence is a big part of the meaning of the horn. As I recall, Boromir appears early, but when the Lord of Minas Tirith was the one who had the dream, there is no mention of a relationship between them. And there is no mention of the Stewardship, Denethor is called the Lord of Minas Tirith. And since Trotter was still a hobbit, there was no King, and therefore no Steward. I'm not sure about the horn, but I think it was added quite a bit later. Please correct me, anyone, if I'm wrong about that.
 

Johannes

New Member
I think we should take it a little easy before we read to much in to the horn fingering. Maybe the important thing is THAT he is fidgeting, not WHAT he is fidgeting with. Maybe the narrator just what to draw attention to the fact that Boromir is agitated, and the horn just happens to be in his hands.

It's like Freud said (allegedly): "Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar".
 
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