Eglarest and Brithombar

Haakon

Administrator
Staff member
Well, here's this picture:
Here's a picture from the coast of Portugal again. I was there a few days ago. This is a small beach (to the right) surrounded by cliffs. The beach was at the end of a long valley stretching northward from the coast. In this example, I believe there was just a small stream in the valley but it could just as well have been a broad river.
So, we could place one of the cities here, and the other a bit less sheltered.
 

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Haerangil

Well-Known Member
that third pic could well be a model for Brithombar, a promontory south of a river mouth...
I also like some elements of the
 

Haerangil

Well-Known Member
problems with my iphone I guess...

I meant I DO like some of the architecture elemrents, particularrly the islamic-Architecture meets mediterranean style... and the Domes!

but you´re right... i might join Faelivrin in the Castle of dolorous Frustration ;-)
 

Faelivrin

Well-Known Member
MithLuin that architecture is a good idea for Brithombar, maybe. The cape off Brithombar is 21 mi long from the river-mouth to the point. The map does show the town right at the river-mouth, but I'd guess that with no thought to defense, they're spread out over the whole cape and along the riverbanks, with the majority of the harborage being at the river mouth. Then, it can have coastal cliffs to the south, near the hills.

Eglarest could be on a more wide-open sound (without the buildings on the short cape) with flatter topography, since it's further from the hills.

Also where there are sea-cliffs, there are likely seabird colonies, if humans haven't killed them all. Bar-i-Myl (Gull-Home, the point several miles southwest of Eglarest) might be named for such a colony. You could put one on cliffs south of Brithombar, to further contrast with the relative flatness around Eglarest.

River names: Brithon (by Brithombar) means gravelly, and Brithombar either means "home on the Brithon" or "gravelly home".
Nenning (by Eglarest), I don't know what it means.

but you´re right... i might join Faelivrin in the Castle of dolorous Frustration ;-)
I live where now? I mean, anyone posting from a phone is just asking for
 

MithLuin

Administrator
Staff member
I have to agree that 'Nenning' isn't much of a clue, geographically. If I had to guess, I'd say the name contains nên (water, pool, stream, waterland)...but that's super generic. Like, yes, it's a river, so....

Nenith is "mothers" in Sindarin, but that doesn't seem relevant.

ninglor (pl.ningloer) means the flower yellow-flag (like gladden).

So...maybe it's possible that Nenning means 'waterland with yellow irises,' but...maybe not, and that doesn't really mean much.
 

Haakon

Administrator
Staff member
If Nenith means ‘mothers’ - perhaps Nenning means something like ‘mother of...’ something. I’ve no idea what this particular river would be a mother of, but it doesn’t seem far fetched.

Edit: Well there should not be any flowers there yet but if the yellow flowers were growing there, the river could be the mother of them. (The mother of the ninglor or ningloer) Not sure if this would work, just brainstorming.
 

Faelivrin

Well-Known Member
I think the glor part of ninglor refers to yellow-ness, and nin or ning means something else. If we really go out on a limb and assume it means "flower" or "iris" then Nenning means something like iris-water or water-flower.

With a flatter topography than Brithombar, it could spread out into a wide reedy delta with lots of water-plants. Unlike the gravelly Brithon, it could have a sandy or clay bed that's nicer for plants. Instead of seabirds like gulls and gannets and auks, it can be full of birds like swans and geese and coots.
 

Haerangil

Well-Known Member
just a theory but I thing Ning might be the Sindarin/Goldogrin Variant of Quewnya
ninquë white, chill, cold, palid

so Nenning would just mean cold/chill Water...
Brithombar as dwelling by a pebble Beach seems a very good interpretation/inspiration

if Eglarest would mean forsaken Ravine... I don´t know, maybe the Town was built in a far off or otherwisely isolated ravine? maybe hard to get to fram more inlandß
 

Haakon

Administrator
Staff member
if Eglarest would mean forsaken Ravine... I don´t know, maybe the Town was built in a far off or otherwisely isolated ravine? maybe hard to get to fram more inlandß
Do you mean as an alternative meaning, instead of ‘ravine of the forsaken (eglath)’?
 

Haakon

Administrator
Staff member
Yes, the -rest part doesn’t have to mean ravine (-ress). Speculating, I can imagine some connection to primitive elvish ezdē which could give a meaning along the lines of ‘place of rest of the forsaken’.
 

Faelivrin

Well-Known Member
Oh, I didn't realize you and Haerangil were talking about etymology still. You're right, it looks like "ravine/cleft of the Eglath". (Ezde > Idh in Sindarin.) That implies that Eglarest is in a steep valley, so then for contrast Brithombar ought to be the relatively flat one.

Would a ravine require sea-cliffs on both sides? With the idea of having them easy to tell apart visually, I don't think both should have sea-cliffs right up against them.
 

Haakon

Administrator
Staff member
Well, rest seems to mean 'cleft' or 'cut' which certainly implies a ravine with two opposing cliffsides. The maps I can find have Eglarest situated apart from where the river Nenning joins the Belegaer, but the cliffs could still be steep enough and high enough to feel close and narrow and give the area the feeling of a ravine.
 
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