Frequently Asked Questions for the Silmarillion Film Project

David_M_R

New Member
Here's a Q I've been itching to ask: what sort of distribution license are contributors (implicitly?) applying to the work they give to the project?

Here's why I ask:
Suppose something super big happened—some adaptation rights got sold—and a studio came knocking, wanting to use the extensive workshopping and research the SilmFIlm project has done (they would be fools not to pay attention!). There's a vague idea (hope?) that Amazon's 2nd Age project could be seen as a trial run, that eventually someone might get a crack at the 1st Age. A few years ago TV adaptation of the Akallabêth would have seemed ludicrous, and it's possible we'll get to see that before the decade is out.
Maybe this is all moot. But it would be far nicer to make the idea of using SilmFilm ideas attractive, rather than a legal minefield to the extent that things are done differently purposely to avoid claims of stealing ideas, even when it is arguably the best approach to a particular thorny problem in adaptation.
 

Nicholas Palazzo

Well-Known Member
Here's a Q I've been itching to ask: what sort of distribution license are contributors (implicitly?) applying to the work they give to the project?

Here's why I ask:
Suppose something super big happened—some adaptation rights got sold—and a studio came knocking, wanting to use the extensive workshopping and research the SilmFIlm project has done (they would be fools not to pay attention!). There's a vague idea (hope?) that Amazon's 2nd Age project could be seen as a trial run, that eventually someone might get a crack at the 1st Age. A few years ago TV adaptation of the Akallabêth would have seemed ludicrous, and it's possible we'll get to see that before the decade is out.
Maybe this is all moot. But it would be far nicer to make the idea of using SilmFilm ideas attractive, rather than a legal minefield to the extent that things are done differently purposely to avoid claims of stealing ideas, even when it is arguably the best approach to a particular thorny problem in adaptation.
That's an excellent question. I think it would fall under the same category as a situation where a friend makes a suggestion on a story you're writing, that later gets published. The author is generally not legally obligated to compensate the sources of his/her ideas.
 

David_M_R

New Member
Well, it gets a bit different when it's years of creative works/decisions and studios with big $ and big lawyers. I hear big-name directors legally cannot discuss your random movie ideas with you, in case you later sue them for copying your idea even just a little. But I don't want to beat a dead horse.
 

MithLuin

Administrator
Staff member
Generally speaking, if a studio were interested in any of the content we've developed...they would have to talk to Corey Olsen about it. I do not foresee this happening, but I imagine he would be engaged in some sort of 'consultant' role, rather than them purchasing the creative work of the Silm Film project.

Currently, the work may be viewed as fanart/fanfiction, and is thus put out onto the internet with the understanding that no one is being financially compensated for their efforts.
 
Top